11th July 2022

UKHSA Consultation on management and treatment of Clostridioides difficile infection.

UKHSA is seeking feedback on its recently updated guidance for management and treatment of Clostridioides difficile infection. The updated document can be accessed here: UKHSA-Clostridioides difficile infection guidance.

If you wish to comment please do so via this online form: C. difficile feedback form. Deadline for comments: 5pm Friday 14 October 2022.

Background:
UKHSA has updated guidance on the management and treatment of C. difficile infection. This guidance includes recommendations and algorithms for the antimicrobial treatment of C. difficile infection, as well as advice relating to diagnostic criteria, severity assessment, infection prevention and control (IPC) measures, and non-antimicrobial therapeutics such as faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT).

In 2021 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published updated guidelines on antimicrobial prescribing for CDI in adults, children and young people following a review of the evidence for all antibiotics available in the UK, based on a network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness modelling. NICE recommendations do not cover non-antimicrobial therapeutics such as faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and advice relating to diagnostic criteria, severity assessment, infection prevention and control (IPC measures) and unlicenced use of antimicrobials.

This UKHSA guidance document is an update of the guidance on the management of CDI published in 2013 and replaces the previous version. This guidance has been broadly aligned with NICE recommendations and agreed by a small expert sub-group following an independent literature review. It provides recommendations based on expert opinion supported by the NICE evidence review and subsequent literature review for the assessment and management of patients with suspected or confirmed CDI.

 

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